Best Compost / Everything you would want to know !


Now I just wanted to show you how a compost
area might look like. We have some leaf mulch here, now i spent much of the morning separating
3 different kinds of materials. There was a big pile ontop of that old compost pile
there, we have a lot of these old branches, leaf mulch. What I’ve also done is shredded
bigger branches and this pile here is green stuff, plenty of flies with vegetable, it
will be mixed with brown stuff. Smaller branches, older compost pile here, lovely black stuff
here with little branches which is important because too much carbon content in soil will
rob nitrogen from soil. Softer branches are okay, bigger branches are not okay. Before
we talk about how we make the compost heap, we talk about this heap I made two months
ago. I made a video on it. We
see black stuff in it, its half decomposed, twigs need to be broken, there is worms, worms
are great. The compost has cooled down and some nasturtium flowers growing here. How to make it: use brown carbon materials
bark, mulch, paper, cardboard leaves twigs, then comes water, fungi and bacteria make
use of it. Then branches are the brown and also allow air pockets to come into compost.
Air is important for fungi to break down the heap, green material we use vegetable peelings,
cow manures, then add soil for worms so worms can have it to break down compost material.
Eventually we go back to browns, water, then greens, every now and then we use an inoculant,
which is fungi found in the forest. Worm castings or adding sweet compost is very good for and
innoculum. Another thing is, different materials in
the garden, weeds, food scraps, leaves, branches,
if you can make sure you have a certain amount of carbon and nitrogen (25:1) if you have
these quantities in the right amount, the decomposition process will do very well. Easiest
way to think of
it is a sandwich, brown on the outside and thin layer of green inside. Also recommend,
with higher compost, make levels of brown and green, add soil in-between, up to a meter
or 2 meters, turn it once a day. It will heat up a lot and adding water will cool it down.
I was using a thermostat to make sure its not above 60C,
but u can leave it there for a day and if its hot to the touch you should turn it and
water it, if its not hot then its okay. You can use this compost for compost tea if you
care for it enough. Bring in microbes from a wormery or an old compost heap that smells
sweet to ensure bacteria. Throw in fungi to innoculate every now and then. Quickly here,
this is hyphen, (fungi decomposing this compost). Hope that answered a lot of question in regards
to making your own compost, This is different from a wormery that’s a low, 30cm high heap,
we feed it by adding nitrogen and carbon materials and worms as well. Now if you have any questions
drop a comment on Youtube, Facebook or private message me, thanks for watching.

59 thoughts on “Best Compost / Everything you would want to know !

  1. I thought the heat is a good thing. It comes from bacteria which eat on your material and turns the bigger molecules into smaller ones, which sets the heat free. Why not just let them do their job? If the bacteria work to busy they create to much heat for them to survive, a couple of them die and the heat stays at about 60° until there is nothing more for them to eat. Once the bacteria are done, the fungi should take over and finish what the bacteria started. That way you save time and water.

  2. Both hot and cold composts are great and worth doing. Hot is beneficial for if you have weed seeds or diseased plants. Cold is great as you do not need to turn at all. The reason for keeping even the hot heap below 60c, is that the compost we make is for using in compost tea. All compost will get way hotter than 60 c if you make the pile high, only turning it and watering will cool it down. You end up with a much different bacteria, if it goes above 60c.
    Credit to Dr. Elaine Ingham
    David.

  3. An inspiringl addition to your wonderful series – highly watchable, information packed video's.

    I 'organically' farm/garden 4 acres in Northern Greece and have lost count of how many times your useful tips have come in handy. I say organic; but it's rapidly looking more and more like permaculture.

    Thanks for sharing.

    Greetings from Greece!

    Nigel

  4. Hi Nigel,
    Thanks for the feed back.
    It is nice you got something out of it 🙂

    Actually I was working on an organic farm for 5 years and part of my job was to test and experiment with many different methods, of natural gardening. So permaculture would have been also on the list. Many don't understand though that permaculture is mainly a natural design tool. It is not really just gardening, but how you design a farm or the area you live. I will be uploading some videos by Warren Brush soon 🙂
    D

  5. Yep! As you say; permaculture is a lifestyle – working with nature by design.

    Interesting to hear of your experimental work; it's an exciting way forward.

    Looking forward to the Warren Brush videos.

  6. David, I was searching through your videos and I could not find seeds of heritage 2, 3, 4 or any other ones ? Did you delete them ? Why ? I thought they were awesome videos and watched them like 20 times each

  7. Sorry I did,
    As I made more instructional videos on the topic. The save vegetable seeds course. I thought to make more space. So I ended up deleting them.
    Did not know you enjoyed them, or I would have left them 😉
    David.

  8. Thanks David. Your videos are always the most informational. i wanted to let you know the Russian kale seeds you've sent me are growing quite nicely in my own compost! 🙂 thanks again. – Jillian

  9. I AM SO HAPPY AND SO GREATFULL OF ALL INFORMATION THAT I GET FROM YOUR VIDEOS AND I WILL USE THEM WITH SO MUCH SECURITY 
    BUT I LIKE TO KNOW HOW AND HOW BUY ALL THIS WORM AND WERMICOMPOST 
    I WILL BE SO HAPPY TO LESSEN FROM YOU
    KOM WITH MORE VIDEOS
    SO MANY REGARDS
      MORAD

  10. Thanks for your comment again David. It really didn't seem right to me from the beginning. I started a new garden and compostpile this year. The new pile wasn't heating up as I expected it would do, so that's why I started some research on the topic. But I'll definetly stick to the same conclusion to keep my pile and garden the natural way instead of the MacDonalds-way 🙂
    Besides… who wants to spill beer anyway?? :p

  11. Hi there! I am getting as much info on compost for starting my own in my tiny garden. But what I don't understand is: Can I start the pile at any point of the month? And being the pile out in the open, if it rained a lot, wouldn't it get too wet? Doesn't it need coverage? btw wonderful videos! Thanks, Izzy

  12. It would be awesome if you could a video possibly on beneficial insect hotel or how to keep beneficial insects around?

  13. David, this is not word for word. I took your general statements and condensed some into sentences that still express what you are saying. I hope this is good enough for your translations. 🙂

    Now I just wanted to show you how a compost area might look like. We have some leaf mulch here, now i spent much of the morning separating 3 different kinds of materials. There was a big pile ontop of that old compost pile there, we have a lot of these old branches, leaf mulch. What I've also done is shredded bigger branches and this pile here is green stuff, plenty of flies with vegetable, it will be mixed with brown stuff. Smaller branches, older compost pile here, lovely black stuff here with little branches which is important because too much carbon content in soil will rob nitrogen from soil. Softer branches are okay, bigger branches are not okay. Before we talk about how we make the compost heap, we talk about this heap I made two months ago. I made a video on it.  We see black stuff in it, its half decomposed, twigs need to be broken, there is worms, worms are great. The compost has cooled down and some nasturtium flowers growing here.

    How to make it: use brown carbon materials bark, mulch, paper, cardboard leaves twigs, then comes water, fungi and bacteria make use of it. Then branches are the brown and also allow air pockets to come into compost. Air is important for fungi to break down the heap, green material we use vegetable peelings, cow manures,  then add soil for worms so worms can have it to break down compost material. Eventually we go back to browns, water, then greens, every now and then we use an inoculant, which is fungi found in the forest. Worm castings or adding sweet compost is very good for and innoculum. Another thing is, different materials in the garden, weeds, food scraps, leaves, branches, if you can make sure you have a certain amount of carbon and nitrogen (25:1) if you have these quantities in the right amount, the decomposition process will do very well. Easiest way to think of it is a sandwich, brown on the outside and thin layer of green inside.   Also recommend, with higher compost, make levels of brown and green, add soil in-between, up to a meter or 2 meters, turn it once a day. It will heat up a lot and adding water will cool it down.  I was using a thermostat to make sure its not above 60C, but u can leave it there for a day and if its hot to the touch you should turn it and water it, if its not hot then its okay. You can use this compost for compost tea if you care for it enough. Bring in microbes from a wormery or an old compost heap that smells sweet to ensure bacteria. Throw in fungi to innoculate every now and then. Quickly here, this is hyphen, (fungi decomposing this compost).  Hope that answered a lot of question in regards to making your own compost, This is different from a wormery that's a low, 30cm high heap, we feed it by adding nitrogen and carbon materials and worms as well. Now if you have any questions drop a comment on Youtube, Facebook or private message me, thanks for watching. 

  14. wow you said 60 degrees so i looked up Fahrenheit and its 140.  That's hot!!! didnt think it could get that hot

  15. Hi you should submit this youtube to the free film contest by the  Global Compost Project here's the link  https://filmfreeway.com/festival/TheCompostContest

  16. I live I have in uncovers 2 yon of organic leaf mulch 15 feet away is where large build up of grass cuttings could I start mixing it up or layer it ? It should say 2 ton will the mulch make a good bed for my potatoes ? Thank you .

  17. Just subscribed, looking forward to seeing more ideas and tips from you on gardening, thanks for your info so far.

  18. You say that the ideal ratio is 25 or 30:1, but what how thick does this make each of the green and brown layers? Thanks!

  19. if you had 2.5 acres of baron land which was rather rocky with little green life it was neither saline or acidic how would you make this land arable( animals are a possibility)
    vague steps will be ok

  20. Thank you for the very interesting video. I am wondering if i can use such compost on a Raspberry plantation instead of using Cow manure?

  21. Make it a habit to always stick that pitch fork into the ground when not in use.  I have an old scar from a carelessly left pitch fork.

  22. Do you know the work of Ernst Gotsch? It looks similar in some ways, and lives up to the name of your channel: Work with nature.
    Greetings from Brazil.

  23. The way I measure my efficiency is time. If I have a well built compost heap, you can have perfect compost with earth worms etc within 18 to 22 days. For this the outside day temperature should be in the 30's Celsius. Cover your compost heap to keep in the heat. Turn your compost every 5 to 7 days. In winter every 14 days, depending on the temperature.

  24. how broken down does it have to be to work as potting soil? i know the compost i brought from the store was still very brown and chippy when it dried out and that doesnt work, my situation is im collecting tropical fruit seeds and tying to grow them in a cool climate but for years ive been held up by only being able to use potting mixes and compost i could buy and nothings grown at all for atleast 3 years its horrible but talk about learning the hard way.. ive got a pile now thats notfully broken down but i need to use it asap, im a bit worried im gonna run short aswel so i didnt want to sift to much out, i also dont have anything i could use as a sifter so yeh lol the decade old potting mixes that my house plants are in is so smooth and spongey and loose its crazy, i wish i had lots of that lol

  25. This seems like a dumb question but I have to work it out in my head.. In the city I had a compost pile I just kept adding and turning but because I was always adding to it, it was never a "finished product". Now I am on a 2 acre place and actually want to use my compost. I watch your video and several others and understand the pile basics but apparently you don't just keep adding to the pile. So do you have a small pile in waiting, for the next big pile? I like piles instead of bins and have space. I see in this video you do have some separate piles. I am assuming you cant just pile kitchen waste in a pile for a long time or it gets funky. This is where my mind gets overwhelmed imagining multiple piles in various stages. Ahhhh! Help me sort this out in my head please!! What is your system throughout the year?

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