Learn How to Garden for Beginners – Container Gardening – Urban Rooftop Porch Patio Balcony


{Opening music} Hi my name is Donna from naztazia.com Did you know you can grow a garden
without a plot of land? Did you know you can grow tomatoes,
cucumbers, zucchini, and other fruits and vegetables in what
most people consider basic flower pot containers? Today I’m going to show you how to do it.
The first thing you need is the container. You can use something
that looks like this or get really creative and use garbage
cans, plastic tubs, even half whiskey barrels. Whatever you use just be sure to drill holes either on the bottom or
along the sides for drainage. Next you need to add soil. For containers you should not use
traditional garden soil. You need a special mixture called potting mix. It’s important to use potting mix because you’ll have less trouble with
weeds. Some people also like to add compost. Finally, you need plants. It’s recommended to put only one plant in a container this size.
However sometimes you can get away with two plants. For some plants cages are
recommended to help the plant grow upwards. To maintain your container gardening it’s important to constantly check the
level of water in the soil. To do this – stick your finger in the soil.
If it feels dry your plants need water. During the really hot summer, sometimes I’ve had to water my containers up to four times a day. Also it’s recommended to get a very good veggie and fruit fertilizer and feed your
container plants according to the directions. I hope this video has helped
you. And please visit naztazia.com for more tips and tricks on Creative, Self Sufficient Living {Closing music and credits}

88 thoughts on “Learn How to Garden for Beginners – Container Gardening – Urban Rooftop Porch Patio Balcony

  1. i cant wait to plant this spring. we almost get to much sun here in cali but its great because we can grow all year….where are you located and are you single lol

  2. Lucky you! I'm in Pennsylvania, and it's only 27 degrees here right now. I have some indoor stuff growing – but most of my outside stuff (e.g. garlic) is dormant right now. Needless to say, I'm really looking forward to the springtime too.

  3. Hello! I live in PA, and the tomatos I plant in containers (Jetstar) absolutely love the outdoors & direct sunlight. Considering you are only 1 state away, I think they'll turn out great for you as well. Might need water 3-4 x's a day. In a bad wind storm, just take them inside. I suggest a wire tomato cage (about $3) for each container since tomato plants grow very tall. 3 gal sized container per 1 plant or 6 gal for 2 plants. Wait until the week of Mem Day to plant. Can't wait until Spring!

  4. I used miracle-gro 2 years years ago but stopped when I learned they use sewage sludge from municipal waste water treatment plants. I go organic these days. The corporate types are trying to get sewage sludge relabeled as organic fertilizer but for the time being if it says organic, it's safe to use.
    Actually I'd be ok with using human waste as fertilizer but companies (and to a lesser extent regular people), dump all kinds of toxic chemicals down the sewer, and it ends up in Miracle-gro.

  5. Are you 100% sure about that? Miracle Gro fertilizer (blue stuff) is actually synthetic and not organic. Sewage sludge (called biosolids), is actually considered organic, and is found in organic fertilizers like Milorganite. Lawns and golf courses are usually the only ones that fertilize with sewage sludge these days. I have never seen any source stating that Miracle Gro fertilizer nor their potting soils contain these biosolids. Feel free to post or send me a gardening link that says it is.

  6. naztazia
    I'm not 100% sure of anything. I heard that bit of news on a radio show a few years back but as far as running around digging up sources for you, I'm sorry I just don't have that kind of time. I invite you to look into it yourself if you have the time but I don't. For me I just use composted kitchen scraps and a bit of lime on the tomatoes and it seems to work well enough for my modest deck garden.

  7. I'll be doing some container gardening this summer. Ive already got a bunch of peppers, tomatoes and other stuff which are growing indoor (seedlings for now). I just have to figure out how to make the yard look nice when filled with pots 🙁

    PS. nice video and cute host too 🙂

  8. Maybe I should ask since you've done this more than I have…if you had to grow some peppers (bell and jalapeno and assorted hots), what size container do you think they'd need per pepper plant to really make sure they grow well? I've been reading about people using a 5 gallon bucket with holes punched in the bottom. Does that sound about right or is that overkill?

  9. @joeybognar

    Thanks for the advice 🙂 I'll look into finding some containers around that size. I found some plastic buckets that are right around 3 gallons in size and they are cheap. I can pick some of those up and drill some holes in the bottom and use them.

  10. I agree with Joey as well. I believe the experts suggest about 2 gallons of soil per bell pepper plant. I've been growing bell peppers for several years, and my plastic containers (from Walmart & Kmart) are 16" in diameter by 16" deep. I put about 2" of river gravel on the bottom, then fill to about 1.5" from the top with potting mix. I put two bell pepper plants per pot (space in between both plants) and everything fits perfectly when full grown.

  11. @naztazia

    I picked up a bunch of 3 gallon containers and started transplanting some of my larger peppers in there (well larger meaning like 10" tall…so not really large) and I decided as a test to put one of the pepper plants in a 5 gallon container to see if there will be much of a difference.

    I'll make another vid in a month or two 🙂 Wish me great luck.

  12. Really good start up info for people just learning how to grow in containers. Doesn't hurt to have a cutie like Donna to host the video either.

  13. Nice video; nice website too! Very, very cute stuff! You are very talented.

    As for gardening in buckets, I have done this for years. I buy ugly black used old 6 gal pots from the nursery for $1. and fill the bottom with pine cones, sticks & whatever is on my ground. Then I add 5 or 6 layers of dirt, compost, dirt, leaves/grass, dirt, compost dirt. I learned from you that watering 4 times a day is a cool idea. I haven't been that generous! I will shape up & be more attentive on hot days!

  14. @joselyn85232 Sorry for the delay in my response… thanks for stopping by and leaving such nice feedback 🙂

  15. @menderfire9 Sorry for the delay in my response. Thanks for stopping by and leaving feedback. Those are great ideas with the pots, fill for the bottom, and especially alternating the dirt/compost. Thanks for sharing !!!

  16. I crochet and garden too! Nice video. I live in an apartment so all my plants are in pots. I am growing 2 kinds of jalapeños, Habañeros, tomatoes, cayennes, and a lot of herbs. I first had a war with the afids early in the season and have just turned the tide in my favor with the snails. I live in Florida so I still have about three more months of growing. I posted videos of my garden if you would like to see! Hope your garden turned out well! Bye!

  17. @covertcriminal Hello! Thank you for stopping by. You are so fortunate to have a few more months of growing left in Florida. I'm in Pennsylvania and only have a few plants left. Indeed those afids and especially squash bugs drive me nuts. As soon as I finish with this post I'll be checking out your videos. Take care!

  18. I enjoyed your video. I'm setting up some 40 gallon containers that were being discarded. I'm making compost in them over the winter and hope to have organic soil in time for spring planting.

  19. @GoingOrganic1 Thanks for the kindness! BTW I received a message from YouTube that you had posted your composting video as a response to mine, but it's not showing up here (don't know if I did something wrong, or if YouTube just glitched). If you have a chance, please attempt again to link it to mine – as I think yours is very good!!!

  20. @naztazia I subscribed to your channel. That should make it easier for the video to show up. I look forward to seeing your future videos.

  21. @ArizonaAdventures Hehe – yeah it is. The problem with containers is you can't water them too much at once otherwise you lose the nutrients in the soil. And you don't want a sloppy wet mess at the bottom of an undrained container because it will damage/rot the roots. Yet because of the more surface area exposed to the heat/sun, they dry out rather quickly.

  22. mmmmm potting mix. I eats potting mix for breakfast with a glass of orange juice,keeps me goin all day.

  23. @jenn1ifer I can only speak for ones native to my area (PA). They produce fruit 60 days after transplant regardless of light cycle. I plant end of May (after frost) & they'll produce fruit beg of Aug. They like direct sunlight, but we had a cloudy rainy summer one time, and I still got nice fruit. The blooms don't like temp extremes (cold nites/scorching hot days), but they do love companion plants next to them like marigolds, onions and basil. But once frost hits in Oct, the plant dies.

  24. @jenn1ifer Better boy and Jet star are my 2 fav tomato varieties 🙂 I plant 2 plants per container & they grow about 4-5 ft tall (including the container). I use those wire cages to support them and keep them straight as they grow. I average 20-30 tomatoes per plant (40-60 per pot). I pick the tomatoes off as soon as they turn red and are still firm and not overripe – regardless if it's just 1 or 15 at a time. I position the container in my yard that gets maximum view of the sun – 6-7 hours.

  25. @Unsharpened I'm not really keen on GM foods/organisms. In my own garden I try to use heirloom seeds and plants that have been passed down through the generations from my local farmers and family. For example the garlic bulbs given to me from my uncle come from plants that can trace their lineage to over 80+ years. Realistically in the supermarket though, we can't be sure what's GMO vs. not. Probably why I like growing food in my own garden 🙂

  26. @naztazia I like your video, a lot of nice tips, But man, you put Miracle grow potting soil in the container. Monsanto from Marysville, Ohio makes that crap. As much as people may like it and plants grow superb in it , I would think a nice mix of regular dirt and compost / or just straight compost would be better than the Miracle grow stuff.

  27. @therealrockondon I completely agree with you – they are one of the best sizes to do container gardening in for many plants. Thanks for stopping by!

  28. That is what I do to the tubs for my garden. everytime i get a new tub, cut small holes on the sides close to the bottom for drainage

  29. hey, i just started growing veggies in my backyard in raised beds and pots. It works great. I was amazed at the harvest from so few plants. please take a look at my channel and please subscribe. thanks!

  30. thanks for this donna. i have started my own container garden. but i'm getting my containers for free. i got mine from wendy's. they have white 5 gallon containers for pickles that they just throw away after using the pickles.

  31. That's an awesome idea!!! You are recycling and reusing… and planting your own food. Doesn't get much better than that 🙂

  32. Sorry for the delay in response! That's great – raised beds are also wonderful for gardening. Helps keeps those rabbits somewhat out of the garden 🙂 Thanks for letting us know about your channel too!

  33. Somehow I missed this comment you made over a year ago! Yep you are right – it was 98 degrees the day I filmed this. That is what you meant, right ? 🙂

  34. HEY THATS GREAT. I DO THE SAME THING. BEFORE I PUT IT IN MY GARDEN I USE CONTAINER FROM FOOD, PAINT, AND MILK CONTAINERS SINCE WHERE I LIVE THE MILK CONTAINER ARE IN PLASTIC.WHY NOT RECYCLE.

  35. Naztazia, I have something for folks to help with this process of growing plant that fits right in with your promoting. Please take a look at this and see what you think. Please go to kickstarter -dot- com and search for Magic Grow Carpet

  36. thanks for the coment on getting the containers fro free from wendys .. i'm wanting to start but have practically no start up money free is good now does that potting Mix have miracle grow in the mix and does that make it not organic starter soil? thanks

  37. Miracle Gro on your food?!?!?! Are you crazy? You won't buy gmo seeds but you will put a chemically fertilized soil in your pots.

  38. and a year later, I have to applaud your clever reply. Though I would also have applauded just ignoring the ignorance…

  39. You can also get free food grade buckets from your supermarket bakery. They use lots of them, and just throw them away normally. And cleaning out frosting is a lot easier than trying to get rid of pickle odor.

    Being white, they do let light into the container though, so taping some panda film, or even cheap black garbage bags will fix that.

  40. I learned a lot from this video. I realized that the process of container gardening will also add instant color to your front porch patio balcony. Everyone must recognize about this especially if you want that your yard to become more comfortable and very refreshing in detail. 

  41. Where can I find out when I should start planting certain veggies? I want to start growing somethings in pots with my kids so and am not sure when to start
    Also I have a lot of squirrels and other animals is it ok to bring the pots in at night when I cannot watch them? Ty

  42. Well, I guess it DID say for beginners.  Get a pot, put soil in it, put a plant in it, water it, if it's hot water it more, feed it.  Got it, thanks.

  43. I understand we shouldn't fill it with soil to the brim (Overflowing water). But 6 inches more soil sure could make a difference in how often you water, more room for roots too. Please, why is the soil  so low?

  44. Hi naztazia, Learn How to Garden for Beginners – Container Gardening – Urban Rooftop Porch Patio Balcony was great I'm looking forward to seeing your next one. Thanks again Rob Summers

  45. It isn't actually wise to feed your potted plants if they have new soil (at least in the first few months) – especially tomato plants. Plants like tomato and pepper need calcium to prevent blossom end rot. A lot of plant feed inhibit the plants ability to soak up the calcium needed. I am not trying to be technical – I just learned that this year with experience and looking up the problem.

  46. Nice video. Check out my family on "Louisiana Gardening Family" on Youtube as well we're gonna be diving into all sorts of gardening ideas from this channel and channels like this one

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