VIRGINIA FARMING: Millennials & Agriculture


♪>>90 YEARS AGO, THE VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU MADE OUR LOCAL FARMERS A PROMISE TO PROTECT AND PRESERVE A WAY OF LIFE THEY WORKED SO HARD TO ESTABLISH. TODAY OUR INSURANCE AGENTS WORK TO PROTECT ALL VIRGINIANS, NOT JUST FARMERS. WE WANT TO KEEP VIRGINIA, VIRGINIA MORE INFORMATION IS AT FARMBUREAUADVANTAGE.COM.>>THE REMARKABLE SOYBEAN. FROM ITS OIL WE GET PRODUCTS LIKE INK, CANDLES, AND PAINT. FROM ITS MEAL WE GET A HIGH-PROTEIN FIBER USED IN FOODS AND ANIMAL FEEDS. NATURAL SOY IS REPLACING CHEMICALS IN PRODUCTS YOU USE EVERY DAY. YOU CAN LEARN MORE ABOUT SOYBEANS AT VASOYBEAN.COM.>>THERE ARE 30,000 ROADWAY ACCIDENTS EAG CARS AND FARM MACHINERY. FARMERS WILL BE MOVING EQUIPMENT FOR PLANTING AND HARVEST SEASON. THE SLOW-MOVING VEHICLE TRIANGLE IN RED AND FLORESCENT ORANGE COLORS AND FLASHING LIGHTS ALLOW FOR QUICK IDENTIFICATION. WHEN YOU SEE AN S AND V SIGN ON FARM EQUIPMENT, SLOW DOWN, PREPAR S SLOW TURNS.>>PATIENCE WILL SAVE LIVES. JUST REMEMBEE O SHARE THE ROAD, WE ALL NEED TO BE RESPONSIBLE, AND WE NEED TO BE GUIDED BY THE LAW.>>MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STARTS WITH YOU. JEFF: MILLENIALS AND AGRICULTURE. NOW THERE’S TWO WOT OFTEN FIND PAIRED TOGETHER. THIS WEEK WE EXPLORE WHAT FARMERS SHOULD KNOW ABOUT MILLENNIALS AND WHAT MILLENNIALS SHOULD KNOW ABOUT AGRICULTURE. MY SPECIAL GUEST FOR THIS CONVERSATION IS MORGAN SLAVEN. WE ALSO HAVE A STORY ON FIELD CONDITIONS DURING THE MONTH OF MAY. PLUS, WE’LL REVIEW A NEW BOOK ABOUT FARM DOGS. THOSE STORIES AND MORE ON THIS EPISODE OF “VIRGINIA FARMING.” I’M JEFF ISHEE. ♪ JEFF: THE SPRING OF 2017 IS PROGRESSING WELL HERE IN THE COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA. FARMERS HAVE NEARLY WRAPPED UP CORN PLANTING SEASON AND ARE NOW TURNING TO OTHER CROPS INCLUDING SOYBEANS, PEANUTS, AND COTTON. FRUIT AND VEGETABLE GROWERS REPORT GENERALLY GOOD FIELD CONDITIONS THIS SPRING WITH THE END RESULT BEING A NICE CROP OF STRAWBERRIES AND A BUMPER CROP OF SPRING VEGETABLES. SOIL MOISTURE IS DESCRIBED AS ADEQUATE ON MOST VIRGINIA FARMS. PONDS ARE MOSTLY FULL AND STREAMS ARE RUNNING AT NEAR NORMAL LEVELS. THE USDA’S NATIONAL AGRICULTURE STATISTICS SERVICE IS NOW FORECASTING THE WINTER WHEAT CROP IN VIRGINIA AT 8.6 MILLION BUSHELS. THAT’S DOWN BY 7% FROM THE PREVIOUS YEAR. STATE STATISTICIAN HERMAN ELLISON SAYS THE PRIMARY REASON FOR THE SMALLER CROP IS REDUCED ACREAGE. FARMERS IN VIRGINIA PLANTED A MUCH SMALLER AREA TO WHEAT LAST FALL. YIELDS, HOWEVER, ARE EXPECTED TO BE 64 BUSHELS PER ACRE THIS YEAR, UP BY 11 BUSHELS WHEN COMPARED TO 2016. VIRGINIA STATE UNIVERSITY AND COOPERATIVE EXTENSION RECENTLY RECOGNIZED A SMALL-SCALE FARMER IN KING AND QUEEN COUNTY FOR HIS EFFORTS IN TEACHING OTHERS ABOUT AG SHERRI MCKINNEY HAS THE STORY. SHERRI: SMALL-SCALE FARMS ARE LOOSELY DEFINED AS THOSE WITH 10 ACRES OR LESS. THE LATEST CENSUS OF AGRICULTURE REPORTS THAT OUT OF APPROXIMATELY 46,000 FARMS IN VIRGINIA, MORE THAN 16,600 FARMS HAVE LESS THAN 9 ACRES IN PRODUCTION. CHARLIE: I’M QUITE ENCOURAGED RIGHT NOW BY THE NUMBER OF SMALL FARMS THAT ARE CROPPING UP IF YOU WILL. THERE IS GROWTH IN THE NUMBERS. IT’S BECAUSE I THINK THE GENERAL PUBLIC WANTS US TO BE HERE. SHERRI: CHARLIE MALONEY AND HIS FAMILY OPERATE DAYSPRING FARMS IN KING AND QUEEN COUNTY. FOR MORE THAN A DECADE, THEY’VE BEEN BUILDING A COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE PROGRAM ON THE 18 ACRES HE FARMS. HE NOW HAS 175 CSA MEMBERS PICKING UP ORDERS OF FRESH VEGETABLES. CUSTOMERS INCLUDE FAMILIES, RESTAU CHARLIE: BECAUSE I WAS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF A COUNSELING CENTER AND MIRIAM HAD A FULL-TIME JOB IN COUNSELING-RELATED WORK. WE HAD FOUR CHILDREN, SO WE HAD OUR HANDS FULL WITH OTHER STUFF. I AND STARTED WORKING HERE FULL TIME. AT THAT POINT, WE WERE REALLY ABLE TO GROW THE MARKET AND GROW THE FARM TO WHERE NOW WE ARE BOTH FULL-TIME FARMERS. SHERRI: VSU HONORED MALONEY WITH THE ANDY HANKINS SMALL FARMER OF THE YEAR AWARD, NAMED AFTER THE LEGENDARY FORMER VSU EXTENSION SPECIALIST ANDY HANKINS, WHO WORKED CLOSELY WITH SMALL PRODUCERS ACROSS THE STATE. HANKINS WAS A TIRELESS ADVOCATE FOR SMALL FARM OPERATORS, INCLUDING FINDING NEW MARKET OPPORTUNITIES AND NETWORK CONNECTIONS. HANKINS PASSED AWAY IN 2012. CHARLIE: FOR ME, IT GOES BACK EVEN BEFORE THEY CALLED IT THE SMALL FARM OUTREACH PROGRAM TO ANDY HANKINS, WHO, WHEN WE STARTED OUT HERE IN THE 1990’S, HE TOOK US SERIOUSLY. ANDY WOULD COME OUT HERE AND SEE WH HE’D BRING OUT OTHER EXTENSION ALL THE SUPPORT AND GIVE US IDEAS ON WHAT WE WERE DOING, MAYBE SOME DIFFERENT CROPS WE MIGHT GROW, MARKETING, JUST A LOT OF GOOD ENCOURAGEMENT. SHERRI: VSU’S SMALL FARM OUTREACH PROGRAM PROVIDES ASSISTANCE IN A WIDE RANGE OF AREAS ACROSS 25 VIRGINIA COUNTIES. PRODUCTION TIPS, FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT, MARKETING, CONNECTING WITH U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROGRAMS, AND OTHER OPPORTUNITIES ARE PROMOTED TO GROWERS. THESE FARMS ARE OFTEN IN AREAS WHERE SMALL PRODUCERS HAVE LIMITED RESOURCES AND ARE AT AN ECONOMIC DISADVANTAGE. MANY OF THESE PROGRAMS ARE VERY PRACTICAL. MALONEY’S FARM OPERATION RECEIVED A BOOST WHEN VSU HELPED HIM APPLY FOR GRANT MONEY TO BUILD HOOP HOUSES IN ORDER TO EXTEND HIS GROWING SEASON. CHARLIE: WE BEGAN TO ATTEND SOME OF THE EVENTS AT VSU AT RANDOLPH FARM THROUGH THEIR EXTENSION PROGRAM AND LATER THE SMALL FARM OUTREACH PROGRAM AND BEGAN TO LEARN MORE PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS FOR EXAMPLE WORKING IN GREENHOUSES AND HIGH TUNNELS AND GROWING SPECIALTY CROPS. IT HELPED US TO BUILD A NETWORK , IF YOU WILL, WITH OTHER PEOPLE DOING SOMETHING SIMILAR. SHERRI: FOR MOREN HOW SMALL FARMERS CAN FIND HELP THROUGH VSU, GO TO THE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE’S WEBSITE AT AGRICULTURE.VSU.EDU AND SEARCH FOR THE SMALL FARM OUTREACH PROGRA REPORTING IN KING AND QUEEN COUNTY, I’M SHERRI MCKINNEY. JEFF: THANK YOU, SHERRI, FOR THAT REPORT. AGRITOURISM IS BIG BUSINESS IN VIRG THAT’S ACCORDING TO GOVERNOR TERRY MCAULIFFE, WHO RECENTLY ANNOUNCED THE RESULTS OF A NEW ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY ON AGRITOURISM. THE BOTTOM LINE INDICATES THAT VIRGINIA’S AGRITOURISM INDUSTRY ACCOUNTS FOR $2.2 BILLION IN ECONOMIC ACTIVITY. THE REPORT ALSO SHOWS AGRITOURISM BUSINESSES HAVE GENERATED ABOUT 22,000 JOBS AND INJECTS ABOUT $135 MILLION IN STATE AND LOCAL TAXES EACH YEAR. MCAULIFFE SAYS AGRITOURISM BRINGS VISITORS TO VIRGINIA, OFFERING THEM A LEARNING EXPERIENCE FOCUSED ON RURAL COMMUNITIES, FARMS, AND AGRICULTURE. FARM TRACTOR SALES ACROSS THE NATION WERE UP IN APRIL. THAT’S ACCORDING TO THE MONTHLY FLASH REPORT PROVIDED BY THE ASSOCIATION OF EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS. SMALLER TRACTORS SEEMED TO BE IN HIGHEST DEMAND, PRIMARILY THOSE TRACTORS WITH FOUR-WHEEL-DRIVE AND UNDER 40 HORSEPOWER. OVERALL, TRACTOR SALES WERE UP ABOUT 7% WHEN COMPARED TO APRIL . SALES OF FARM COMBINES FOR THE MONTH WERE ABOUT EVEN WITH LAST YEAR. VIRGINIA CATTLEMEN ARE SEEING A LOT OF FOREIGN DEMAND FOR QUALITY BEEF. CLINT MEFFORD HAS THE STORY FROM THE AMERICAN ANGUS ASSOCIATION. CLINT: THE STRONG U.S. DOLLAR LEFT DISADVANTAGE IN RECENT YEARS, DESPITE GROWING OPPORTUNITIES IN SO WITHOUT THE TRANS-PACIFIC PARTNERSHIP, THE BEEF TRADE IS LO SECURE THOSE MARKETS. BACUS: THAT’S WHY IT’S IMPORTANT, NOW MORE THAN EVER, TO REALLY WORK TO TEAR DOWN THOSE TARIFF AND NON-TARIFF BARRIERS, AND THE BEST WAY TO DO THAT IS THROUGH FREE TRADE AGREEMENTS. CLINT: WITH BEEF SUPPLIES RISING, EXPORTS MUST PLAY A LARGER ESPECIALLY FOR THE CUTS NOT MUCH IN DEMAND HERE, LIKE TONGUE AND TRIPE. BACUS: OUR GOVERNMENT COULD CHOOSE TO WITHDRAW FROM NAFTA, AN THE TARIFFS THAT WE PLACED ON FOREIGN GOODS WOULD GO BACK INTO PLACE. IT WOULD ALSO MEAN THAT ALL THOSE GOODS, ALL THE EXPORTS THAT WE SEND TO MEXICO WOULD RECEIVE THAT 25% TARIFF RATE THAT THEY DID PRE-NAFTA. CLINT: THE NATIONAL CATTLEMEN’S THE GOVERNMENT AND INDUSTRY TO OPEN MORE MARKETS. BACUS: WE’RE CAPITALIZING ON THAT HIGH-END GRAIN-FINISHED BEEF THAT ASIAN CONSUMERS ARE REALLY BUYING IN RECORD NUMBERS. WE LOOK FORWARD TO CAPITALIZING ON THAT AN VALUE TO THE BOTTOM LINE OF OUR PRODUCERS. CLINT: I’M CLINT MEFFORD. JEFF: THANK YOU, CLINT, FOR THAT REPORT. COUNTY FAIR SEASON IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER, A TIME FOR RURAL COMMUNITIES TO CELEBRATE AGRICULTURE, HAVE FUN ON CARNIVAL RIDES, AND EAT SOME REALLY ONE OF THE MOST ACTIVE PLACES AT MANY VIRGINIA FAIRS IS THE LIVESTOCK BARN, WHERE MEMBERS OF 4-H AND FFA SHOW THEIR FINEST ANIMALS. WE HAVE NUMEROUS COUNTY FAIRS COMING UP IN EARLY SUMMER, INCLUDING THE GREENE COUNTY FAIR IN STANARDSVILLE. THERE’S ALSO THE CAROLINE COUNTY AGRICULTURAL FAIR IN RUTHER GLEN AND THE TAZEWELL COUNTY FAIR IN TA WHETHER YOU ARE LOOKING FOR TRACTOR PULLS, LIVESTOCK SHOWS, OR JUST TO SEE WHO CAN GROW THE BIGGEST PUMPKIN, WE ENCOURAGE EVERYONE TO VISIT THEIR LOCAL COUN MILLENNIALS AND AGRICULTURE. WHAT DO MILLENNIALS KNOW ABOUT FARMING, AND WHAT DO FARMERS KNOW ABOUT MILLENNIALS? THAT’S OUR FOCUS ON AG INSIGHTS, COMING UP NEXT. ♪ JEFF: HELLO, EVERYBODY. JEFF ISHEE HER FARMING.” IT IS MY PLEASURE TO WELCOME BACKM, WITH US SEVERAL WEEKS AGO, MORGAN SLAVEN. YOU’RE FROM HERE IN WEYERS CAVE, VIRGINIA AND THE BEAUTIFUL SHENANDOAH VALLEY OF VIRGINIA — A VERY HISTORIC SPOT FOR VIRGINIA AGRICULTURE AND ORGANIZATIONS THAT YOU’VE BEEN INVOLVED WITH — BUT TELL US MORE ABOUT YOURSELF. ONE OF THE THINGS I WANT TO TALK ABOUT TODAY WITH MORGAN, SHE IS IN HER MID-20’S. I WANT TO TALKBO IN AGRICULTURE. AND I THINK WE’RE GOING TO HAVE SOME INTERESTING — [LAUGHTER] MORGAN: I THINK SO. [LAUGHTER] JEFF: WELL, THERE’S A LOT OF TH TELL US ABOUT MORGAN SLAVEN. MORGAN: SURE. WELL, THE FIRST THING I ALWAYS TE PART OF THE FAMILY FARM ING OPERATION HERE IN WEYERS CAVE. MY SIBLINGS AND I ARE THE SIXTH GEN OUR FAMILY FARM, AND THAT’S SOMETHING I’M VERY PROUD OF. BUT I CURRENTLY HAVE A 9:00-TO-5:00 JOB WITH THE VIRGINIA FOUNDATION FOR AGRICULTURE IN THE CLASSROOM AS A BUT, DEFINITELY VERY PASSIONATE ABOUT AGRICULTURE ADVOCACY, AGRICULTURE LITERACY, AND BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN PRODUCER AND CONSUMER. JEFF: YOU ALSO HAVE EXPERIENCE WITH FARM BUREAU I BELIEVE? MORGAN: I DO. JEFF: AND WITH A — YOU WERE A STATE OFFICER WITH FFA. MORGAN: I WAS. SO A LOT OF — I USED TO DO SOME PROGRAM WORK WITH AMERICAN FARM BUREAU WITH THE YOUNG FARMER AND RA DEVELOPMENT AND THEN ALSO WAS ON STATE STAFF. AFTER I WAS A STATE I WAS THE STATE COORDINATOR FOR THE FFA OFFICER TEAM FOR SEVERAL YEARS. SO I LOVE THAT PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT WORK, TOO. JEFF: VERY INVOLVED IN VIRGINIA AGRICULTURE, AND WE CERTAINLY APPRECIATE EVERYTHING YOU DO, MORGAN. ALL RIGHT, MILLENNIALS AND AGRICULTURE. A LOT OF US OLD FOGIES [LAUGHTER] JEFF: WE’RE TRYING TO FIGURE THIS OUT, BUT MAYBE YOU CAN HELP US. THERE’S A GENERATION AGE, I DON’T KNOW, 18 TO — TO MID-30’S OR SO, AND WE — WE ARE TRYING TO UNDERSTAND FROM A COUPLE OF DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES ABOUT MILLENNIALS IN AGRICULTURE. I THINK MOST OF US ARE — WE ARE CONCERNED ABOUT THE FUTURE OF AGRICULTURE AND WHERE IS IT GOING TO GO FROM HERE. THE AVERAGE VIRGINIA FARMER IS 58. THAT’S MY AGE. I’M 58 YEARS OLD. SO WHAT IS VIRGINIA AGRICULTURE GOING TO LOOK LIKE 30 YEARS FROM NOW WHEN YOU’RE IN YOUR — [LAUGHS] JEFF: SO LET’S BROACH THIS FROM A COUPLE OF DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES. FIRST OF ALL THE CR PERSPECTIVE. MORGAN: YES. JEFF: WHAT IMPACT HAS MILLENNIAL HAD ON AGRICULTE FROM THE CONSUMER PROSPECTIVE? MO: THING THAT COMES TO MY MIND WHEN YOU ASK THAT QUESTION IS I REMEMBER SITTING IN A COMMON SPAC VIRGINIA TECH, AND THE COMMON BOOK THAT YEAR WAS “ANIMAL VEGETABLE MIRACLE,” AND IT TALKED ABOUT LOCALLY-SOURCING FOOD AND THIS FAMILY — WHO ACTUALLY I BELIEVE RESIDED IN SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA — ONLY GOT THEIR FOOD — SOURCED THEIR FOOD FROM WITHIN, I THINK, MAYBE A HUNDRED MILES OR SOMETHING. SO I REMEMBER SITTING IN MY ROOM AND OVERHEARING ONE OF MY PEERS OUT IN THE COMMON SPACE SAY, “YOU GUYS, AFTER I READ THIS COMMON BOOK, WE CAN’T EAT THE POTATOES AT D2.” AND I SAID, “WHAT IN THE WORLD?” SO I GO OUT AND I LISTENED IN ON TH SHE SAID, “THE POTATOES ARE FROM IDAHO, SN ONLY GET FOOD FROM WITHIN A HUNDRED MILES.” SHE SAID THIS WHILE HOLDING A STARBUT REALLY SURE OF COCOA BEANS AND SUGAR ARE SOURCED WITHIN A HUNDRED MILES BLACKSBURG. BUT, WITH THAT BEING SAID, I BELIEVE THE MILLENNIALS, ESPECIALLY NOW THAT WE’RE GETTING INTO THE CONSUMER WORLD, WE’RE MAKING PURCHASING DECISIONS IN THE GROCERY STORE. YOU KNOW, WE’RE FINDING AND SOUR I THINK CONSUMERS, ESPECIALLY IN THE MILLENNIAL AGE, ARE MOST INTERE INFORMATION FIRSTHAND. AND WHEREAS GENERATIONS HAVE REFERRED TO THE NEWS OR DID THEIR OWN RESEARCH, A LOT OF TIMES THEY’RE GETTING — MILLENNIALS ARE GETTING PEER RECOMMENDATIONS. YOU SEE ALL THE TIME ON FACEBOOK, THOSE ADS. JEFF: IT IS TRULY A DIFFERENT AGE BECAUSE WHEN I WAS YOUR AGE IT WAS ALL ABOUT TV DINNERS AND CO AND WHOEVER READ A LABEL ON A FOOD PRODUCT? WHO CARED WHERE IT C BUT NOW PEOPLE REALLY WANT TO KNOW NOT ONLY WHERE IT CAME FROM , BUT THEY WANT TO KNOW EXACTLY HOW IT WAS PRODUCED. WHY? MORGAN: I THINK A LOT OF IT COMES FROM — ESPECIALLY THE IDEA OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT. A LOT OF MILLENNIALS ARE MORE AWARE ABOUT THEIR PLACE IN SOCIETY AND MAYBE HOW THEY INFLUENCE THE PEOPLE AROUND THEM, THE WORLD AROUND THEM, SO I THINK THAT — AND THIS IS MY PERSPECTIVE — THAT A LOT OF CONSUMER MILLENNIALS ARE OUT THERE WONDERING, “OK, I DON’T KN FOOD, I WANT TO MAKE SURE I’M SUPPORTING SOMEBODY LOCALLY, MY MONEY’S BEING USED THE RIGHT WAY,” AND ALSO TO MAKE SURE THAT T THEY, WHEN THEY GO TO EAT. JEFF: GUILT-FREE. THAT’S INTERESTING. THEY WANT TO THEY HAVE A CONSCIOUS. YOU SEE, THAT’S TOTALLY ALIEN TO YOU WENT THROUGH THE DRIVE-THRU AND YOU COULD CARE LESS AS LONG AS IT WAS BOUGHT IT. MORGAN: EXACTLY! [LAUGHTER] JEFF: WELL THAT’S, THAT’S VERY INTERESTING. OF COURSE WE HAVE SEEN A LOT OF B FARM-TO-TABLE MOVEMENT. I HAVEN’T BEEN INSIDE A UNIVERSITY CAFETERIA IN A LONG, BUT I SUSPECT IT LOOKS DRAMATICALLY DIFFERENT FROM WHEN I WAS IN COLLEGE. MORGAN: OH YES. AGAIN, THAT YEAR IT BECAME A BIG PUSH TO WANT TO HAVE THIS LOCALLY- BELIEVE NOW VIRGINIA TECH IS UTILIZING A LOT OF THEIR OWN LIVESTOCK, BEEF PRODUCTS, SOME OF THE ON FARM, OR ON UNIVERSITY RAISED PRODUCTS IN THE CAFETERIAS NOW. JEFF: WELL, IT’S ALL ABOUT CHANGE AND PEOPLE ACCEPTING CHANGE. YOU KNOW, THERE’S AN OLD PEARL OF WISDOM THAT SAYS THE ONLY CHAN COMES FROM A VENDING MACHINE. MORGAN: THIS IS TRUE. JEFF: BUT E CONSTANT — THERE IS GOING TO BE CHANGE. NOW LET’S TALK ABOUT T THAT WE COULD SEE IN PRODUCTION AGRICULTURE WITH MILLENNIALS. HOW MANY PEOPLE, AND TELL ME ABOUT SOME OF YOUR, YOUR FRIENDS WHO ARE INTERESTED IN BEING AN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCER. MORGAN: I THINK THAT THE FACE OF AGRICULTURE PRODUCER WILL CHANGE IN THE WAY THAT THEY MANAGE THEIR TIME, MONEY, AND RESOURCES. I BELIEVE MILLENNIALS THAT ARE MY AGE ARE MORE INTERESTED IN RESEARCHING, AGAIN KIND OF THAT SAME ASPECT FOR CONSUMERS ARE RESEARCHING MORE WHERE THEIR FOOD COMES FROM, MILLENNIALS MY AGE ARE THINKING, “OK, HOW CAN I BE THE MOST EFFICIENT?” MAYBE IT’S APPS ON THEIR PHONE IT’S ATTENDING A LOT OF THE SEMINARS THAT EXTENSION OR FARM CREDIT ARE HOSTING SO THAT THEY CAN GET A BETTER IDEA, BUT I THINK MILLENNIALS ARE A LEARNING GENERATION, AND THEY’RE GOING TO BE CONSTANTLY TRYING TO STAY AHEAD THAT THEY’RE UP TO DATE WITH T HIGHEST TECHNOLOGY THAT THEY CAN UTILIZE. JEFF: WE’RE TALKING WIT SLAVEN. MORGAN WHAT CAN WE — PEOPLE IN MY GENERATION — AND AGAIN, I AM THE AGE OF THE AVERAGE VIRGINIA FARMER, 58 YEARS OLD. WHAT CAN WE DO TO ENSURE THE SUCCESS THAT AGRICULTURE CONTINUES AND THAT THOSE PRODUCERS ARE SUCCESSFUL? MORGAN: I THINK THE GREATEST BIT OF ADVICE I CAN GIVE ON THIS IS TO GIVE IT A SHOT. I READ AN ARTICLE ONE TIME THAT QUESTIONED THE COMMITMENT OF YOUNG PEOPLE TO AGRICULTURE, AND I DON’T THINK THAT, THAT OUR MORE MATURE GENERATION SHOULD DISCOUNT NEW IDEAS JUST BECAUSE THEY’RE DIFFERENT FROM MAYBE HOW THEY HAVE DONE IN THE PAST. THERE’S A HUGE — YOU KNOW, WE’RE BEING COMPARED TO THE BABY BOOMERS AS FAR AS CAUSING CHANGE WITHIN SOCIETY AND CULTURE, AND SO I WOULD SAY GIVE US A SHOT BECAUSE WE HAVE — WE’RE LOOKING AT THE HIGHEST INTEREST RATES, LOOKING AT THE HIGHEST TUITION, WE ARE STILL GOING TO SCHOOL TO BECOME INVOLVED IN PRODUCTION AGRICULTURE, AND WE’RE COMING OUT WITH, YOU KNOW, LESS ACCESS TO CAPITAL, LESS ACCESS TO LAND, AND IT’S A NEW TIME BUT GIVE US A SHOT. WE WILL MAKE IT HAPPEN. JEFF: WELL, THERE CERTAINLY IS A LOT OF CREATIVITY OUT THERE, AND MA FARMERS HERE IN VIRGINIA WHO DON’T EVEN HAVE THE LAND. THEY ARE GROWING, FOR INSTANCE, SA WAREHOUSE AND IT WORKS! AND THEY’RE MAKING A PROFIT. SO MY GENERATION WOULD SAY ARE THEY REALLY FARMERS? YOU DON’T HAVE TO RIDE A TRACTOR TO BE A FARMER. MORGAN: EXACTLY — PLOWS, COWS, AND SOWS ANYMORE! [LAUGHTER] JEFF: WELL, AGAIN THIS IS A VERY INTERESTING TOPIC I KNOW TO A LOT OF OUR VIEWERS BECAUSE, I THINK, AND I’M SURE ALL OF OUR VIEWERS, WE WANT TO ENCOURAGE THE NEXT GENERATION. WE WANT TO MAKE SURE THAT VIRGINIA AGRICULTURE CONTINUES IN THE F MAKE SURE THAT WE’RE NOT EVER AT A POINT WHERE WE’RE IMPORTING MOST OF OUR FOOD SUPPLY. I THINK MOST OF OUR VIEWERS WOULD AGREE WITH ME, AND I HOPE YOU WOULD AGREE WITH ME, THAT WE WANT OUR FOOD TO BE LOCALLY-SOURCED, IF POSSIBLE, BUT CERTAINLY WITHIN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND GROWN BY AMERICAN FARMERS. MORGAN: EXACTLY. JEFF: OBVIOUSLY WE DO HAVE TO — TO IMPORT SOME THINGS, BUT NOT EVERYTHING. VERY INTERESTING CONVERSATION, AND I LOOK FORWARD TO HAVING YOU BACK ON THE PROGRAM MAYBE AGAIN IN THE FUTURE AND WILL CONTINUE THIS CONVERSATION ABOUT MILLENNIAL WE’LL BE RIGHT BACK. ♪ JEFF: THIS WEEK WE TAKE A LOOK AT A NEW BOOK CONCERNING DOGS ON THE FARM. THE TITLE WE ARE REVIEWING THIS WEEK IS “FARM DOGS.” IT IS A RELATIVELY NEW BOOK, JUST PUBLISHED IN 2016. “FARM DOGS” IS A COMPREHENSIVE BREED GUIDE TO 93 DIFFERENT GUARDIAN DOGS, HERDING DOGS, AND OTHER EXAMPLES OF WORKING DOGS THAT ARE OFTEN FOUND ON FARMS. FROM THE TABLE OF CONTENTS ALL THE WAY TO THE INDEX, AUTHOR JANET DOHNER HELPS US GAIN A DEEPER CANINE FRIENDS, ESPECIALLY THOSE THAT THAT MAY BE USED BY FARMERS FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES. FOR INSTANCE, HOW DO YOU CHOOSE THE APPROPRI PARTICULAR FARMING OPERATION? IS IT AN AKBASH, AN AUSTRALIAN CATTLE DOG, OR PERHAPS A JACK RUSSELL? THIS BOOK OFFERS AN IN-D GUISE TO THE BEHAVIORS AND TEMPERAMENTS EXHIBITED BY CERTAIN “FARM DOGS” IS FULL OF COLORFUL PHOTOGRAPHS AND NUMEROUS CHARTS. IT REALLY HELPS PEOPLE TO UNDERSTAND SOME OF THE POSSIBILIT CHOOSING A DOG FOR YOUR FARM. THE BOOK IS 352 PAGES, SOFTBOUND, AND WAS PUBLISHED BY ST IT IS AVAILABLE FROM NUMEROUS RESOURCES. OUR PEARL OF WISDOM THIS WEEK COMES FROM RALPH WALDO EMERSON , WHO ONCE SAID, “WE AIM ABOVE THE MARK TO HIT THE MARK.” SUBMIT YOUR OWN PEARL OF WISDOM THROUGH OUR WEB SITE AT VIRGINIAFA REMEMBER, YOU CAN CATCH OUR SHOW ON-DEMAND ANYTIME YOU LIKE — EVEN FROM YOUR SMARTPHONE — AT VI THAT DOES IT FOR OUR SHOW THIS WEEK. HAVE A GREAT WEEK EVERYONE! I’M JEFF ISHEE FOR VIRGINIA “VIRGINIA FARMING.” [CAPTIONING MADE POSSIBLE BY WVPT] [CAPTIONING PERFORMED BY THE NATIONAL CAPWHICH IS RESPONSIBLS CAPTION CO.] ♪ ♪>>90 YEARS AGO, THE VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU MADE OUR LOCAL FARMERS A PROMISE TO PROTECT AND PRESERVE A WAY OF LIFE THEY WORKED WE WANT TO KEEP VIRGINIA, VIRGINIA. ANYONE CAN BE A FARM BUREAU MEMBER, AND THERE’S A LOCAL FARM BUREAU IN EVERY COUNTY. MORE INFORMATION IS AT VAFARMBUREAU.ORG.>>VIRGINIA SOYBEAN FARMERS ARE HARD AT WORK, GROWING SOYBEANS TO PRODUCE PRODUCTS YOU USE EVERY DAY! CANDLES, SOAPS, EVEN CRAYONS CAN BE MADE FROM SOYBEANS. REMEMBER, WHEN YOU BUY SOY, YOU’RE HELPING TO SUPPORT AMERICAN JOBS, THE ECONOMY, AND OUR NATION’S ENERGY SECURITY.>>WE ALL WANT HEALTHY RIVERS AND STREAMS, BUT WE CAN’T DO THAT WITHOUT THE HELP OF VIRGINIA LAND OWNERS. RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLANS, OR RMP’S, ARE PART OF A VOLUNTARY PROGRAM THAT HELPS FARMERS GET CR F WATERS. ONCE YOU HAVE AN RMP, YOU ARE EXEMPT FROM ANY NEW WATER QUALITY REQUIREMENTS FOR NINE YEARS. THE VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION AND RECREATION HAS FUNDS AVAILABLE TO HELP YOU IMPLEMENT THESE PLANS. CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT TODAY TO LEARN MORE. THANK YOU.>>THIS MESSAGE SPONSORED BY VIRGINIA’ AGRICULTURE COMMUNITY*>>CHECK OUT “VIRGINIA FARMING” ON FACEBOOK! “VIRGINIA FARMING’S” FARMING’S FACEBOOK PAGE IS A STAY CONNECTED WITH VIRGINIA AGRICULTURE. YOU MIGHT EVEN FIND SOME HUMOR THERE, TOO. YOU’LL FIND LINKS TO EVENTD HAPPENINGS ALL OVER THE COMMONWEALTH THA INTEREST TO FARMERS AND CONSUMERS ALIKE. SO CONNECT WITH US YOUR STORIES AND PHOTOS WITH THE “VIRGINIA FARMING” COMMUNITY, AND KEEP UP TO DATE ON ALL THINGS A”VIRGINIA FARMING” ON F! ♪

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